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Posts Tagged ‘literature review’

A doctoral program includes more than just attending and passing courses. As the highest level of formal learning, it is important to develop skills in scholarly writing, literature reviews, critical analysis, and making recommendations. These skills transfer to the dissertation process and the colloquium provides a strong foundation upon which to build.

After completing the core foundations and research courses, doctoral students are asked to begin to explore the literature about a chosen topic that will eventually lead to a dissertation topic. According to our doctoral handbook,

This requires the student to write a scholarly paper and to present that paper in a formal, public seminar to the educational community. Presentations are scheduled each summer. The scholarly expectation is that the paper will not be simply descriptive, but will also include (the student’s and not someone else’s) analysis and evaluation. This will generally require the student to state and defend his/her own thesis about the topic.”

After multiple edited drafts of the paper, the students present their papers in formal and public forums that are held each summer. Students present their papers in a research presentation format. They are limited to 20 minutes that is followed by a question and answer period. This format is modeled after the format of a research conference.

Below is a list of the 2015 Colloquium papers being presented this year. There are a wide variety of educational topics that reflect the varied professional and personal interests of the students. Each session will be held in the library seminar room from 1:00 – 4:30 p.m.

July 14, 2015

Principal Perceptions of Preparation for Leadership in Special Education, Jennifer Norton

Learning to Doing: Bioethics Action in Nursing Care, Heidi Monroe

The Relationship between Cognitive Gap on Conflict and Coping Behavior of Superintendent School Board Teams, Doug Asbjornsen

The Impact of Metacognitive Practice on Academic Achievement, Nalline Baliram

July 15, 2015

Group Supervision: Theory and Practice, Stacy Mehlberg

Foundations for School Improvement, Anna Horton

Motivational Interviewing: A Potential Tool for Secondary School Counselors, Reagan North

July 16, 2015

Literacy for Students with Down Syndrome: A Curriculum in Flux, Margaret Dornay

The Role of Executive Function Skills in Kindergarten Readiness, Amy Wright

The Efficacy of Cognitive Behavior Therapy as a School wide Positive Behavior Intervention, Omar Flores

A Review of School Psychology and Positive Behavior Intervention and Support, Homero Flores

July 21, 2015

Teacher Feedback and Student Self-Efficacy, Tammy Small

Understanding the Challenges Novice Programmers Face in Introductory Computer Programming Courses, Jim Mendes

The Impact of Sheltered Observation Protocol on the Learning of ELL Students, Miriam Mickelson

The Practice of Mindfulness to Reduce Stress Among Educators, Kaley Rankine

July 22, 2015

Assessing Creativity, Jeffrey Youde

Effects of Shame Resiliency Theory in Women, Christy Baumann

Principal Turnover: Identification and Utility of Contributing Factors, Kathleen Cifu

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A doctoral program includes more than just attending and passing courses. As the highest level of formal learning, it is important to develop skills in scholarly writing, literature reviews, critical analysis, and making recommendations. These skills transfer to the dissertation process and the colloquium provides a strong foundation upon which to build.

After completing the core foundations and research courses, doctoral students are asked to begin to explore the literature about a chosen topic which will eventually lead to a dissertation topic. According to our doctoral handbook,

“This requires the student to write a scholarly paper and to present that paper in a formal, public seminar to the educational community. Presentations are scheduled each summer. The scholarly expectation is that the paper will not be simply descriptive, but will also include (the student’s and not someone else’s) analysis and evaluation. This will generally require the student to state and defend his/her own thesis about the topic.”

After multiple edited drafts of the paper, the students present their papers in formal and public forums which are held each summer. Students present their papers in a research presentation format. They are limited to 20 minutes which is followed by a question and answer period. This format is modeled after the format of a research conference.

Below is a list of the 2013 Colloquium papers being presented this year. There are a wide variety of educational topics which reflect the varied professional and personal interests of the students.

School Board Impact on Student Achievement: A Review of the Research on the Influence of Locally Elected School Boards, by Jon Holmen

Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) Use and Students’ CAS Self-Efficacy in Undergraduate College Mathematics Classes, by Daphne Sluys

Service-Learning and Character Development, by Owen Sallee

Discipline-Based Art Education K-8 and Student Achievement, by Patti Hayes

Passive Recipients or Active Participants: Exploring Views of Children in the Christian Church, by Heather Ingersoll

Principal Technology Leadership Attributes for Effective Integration of Information and Communication Technology in Schools, by Jon Tienhaara

Toward a Transformative History Education: Project- and Problem-based Learning, Reflective Assessment, and Academic Discussion, by Kimberly Jensen

Principal Instructional Leadership and Improved Student Growth, by Alison Brynelson

The Role of Resilience among High School Principals Leading Change, by Paige Wescott

An Application of Jerome Bruner’s Cultural Psychology Theory to Teaching and Learning in the History Classroom, by Eric Boyer

Pedagogical Reform in Tanzania: Issues Raised When Adopting a Learner-Centered Instructional Approach for Implementing the Competency-Based Curriculum of the Tanzanian Primary Schools, by Michael Msendekwa

Supporting Preservice Teachers in Preparation of Teacher Performance Assessment through Facilitating Reflective Writing in E-portfolios, by Daihong Chen

The Relationship Between Leaders’ Supervisory Behavior and Teacher Reflective Practice, by Lisa Truemper

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